PNC, Library Present Screening of “Learning to Drive

The movie “Learning to Drive” will be offered through a collaboration between Purdue University North Central’s Odyssey Arts and Cultural Events Series and Michigan City Public Library. The showing is free and open to the public.

“Learning to Drive” will be shown on Sunday, Feb. 21 at 2 p.m. at the Michigan City Public Library, 100 E. Fourth St. in Michigan City. The film is rated R.

“Learning to Drive” centers on the relationship that forms between literary agent, played by Patricia Clarkson, and her Indian-American driving instructor, played by Ben Kingsley. The movie is an adaptation of an essay by feminist author Katha Pollitt that appeared in “The New Yorker.”

The film’s main characters are brought together when Clarkson’s character finds the need to learn to drive following her divorce. Her driving teacher (Kingsley) is a Sikh Indian and part-time cabdriver, who had been a university professor in his native India and was imprisoned for his religious beliefs. He won political asylum in the United States, but faces an arranged marriage with a woman from India he has never met.

The movie features moments of gentle humor and touches on many subjects: divorce, rage and financial warfare; conflicting philosophies of marriage and parent-child strife.

“The Washington Post” notes that Clarkson’s and Kinsley’s “styles fuse nicely with the unassuming tone of a film that’s content to hum along pleasantly.”

Purdue University North Central Odyssey Arts and Cultural Events Series features various events throughout the year. A complete schedule of events can be found at www.pnc.edu. For more information about this film, or any event in the Odyssey series, contact Judy Jacobi, PNC assistant vice chancellor of Marketing and Campus Relations, at 219-785-5593. Persons with disabilities requiring accommodations should contact Jacobi.

2015 PNC Sinai Forum Presents Nomi Prins

nomi prins

The 62nd season of the Purdue University North Central Sinai Forum will present Nomi Prins, author of “All the Presidents’ Bankers,” on Nov. 15 at 4 p.m. (CT) at the Blue Chip Casino Stardust Event Center, 777 Blue Chip Drive, in Michigan City.

The accomplished financial analyst, journalist and author spoke to the Forum in 2011, presenting a chilling account of the U.S. recession. This time, Prins will provide an inside view of money and influence, two of America’s abiding concerns.

The Times of Northwest Indiana is the event sponsor.

Prins appears on BBC and on CNN, CNBC, MSNBC, CSPAN, FOX and PBS. She is a Distinguished Senior Fellow of the non-partisan public policy think tank, Demos. Her new book is a groundbreaking narrative about the relationships of U.S. presidents to key bankers during the past century and how they impacted domestic and foreign policy.

A book signing will follow the program.

Her other books include a historical novel about the 1929 crash, “Black Tuesday,” and the hard-hitting expose “It Takes a Pillage: Behind the Bonuses, Bailouts, and Backroom Deals from Washington to Wall Street;” as well as “Other People’s Money: The Corporate Mugging of America” and “Jacked.”

She has authored articles that have been featured in “The New York Times,” “Mother Jones,”  “Fortune,” “Newsday,” “Newsweek,” “The Guardian,” “The Nation,” “Alternet,” “Slate,” “LaVanguardia” and others.

Tickets for the PNC Sinai forum season are $75 for regular subscription passes and $200 for patron subscription passes, which include reserved section seating and exclusive receptions with the speakers. Students who show a valid school I.D. are always free. Tickets can be purchased by credit card online at www.sinaiforum.org or by cash or check at: The Lubeznik Center for the Arts, 101 W. Second St., Michigan City; Kabelin Hardware, 512 Andrew Ave., La Porte; The PNC Chancellor’s Office, Schwarz Hall, Room 137, 1401 S. U.S. Hwy. 421, Westville; Undergraduate Building at PNC-Porter County, 600 Vale Park Road, Valparaiso.

The Sinai Forum season sponsors are IU Health La Porte Hospital and Times Media Company. The sustaining sponsors are “La Porte Herald Argus” and “The News Dispatch.” The John W. Anderson Foundation is a program sponsor, and individual program sponsors are Duneland Health Council, IU Health La Porte Hospital, Horizon Bank, Times Media Company and the Leonard J. and Irene Brown Foundation.

Patron-level ticket holders will be welcome to attend all speaker receptions, which will be hosted by Wendy J. Levenfeld & Associates, NIPSCO, Ideas in Motion Media, Valparaiso Chamber of Commerce and the South Shore Leadership Center.

The Forum continues its commitment to presenting speakers who explore compelling contemporary issues, providing audience members with the unique opportunity to hear from experts in their fields speak to topics in the news and to pose face-to-face questions in a town-hall style forum. Wendy Levenfeld, Forum executive director, will host the series. Additional information about the Purdue University North Central Sinai Forum is available at www.sinaiforum.org.

The Sinai Forum season will conclude on Dec. 6 at 4 p.m. CT, with “Ernie,” a one-hour play written by Dr. Jerry Holt, chair of the PNC Department of English & Modern Languages, starring actor Steven Becker. The evening is sponsored by the Leonard J. & Irene Brown Foundation.

PNC, Library Present Screening of “Mr. Holmes”

The movie “Mr. Holmes” will be shown on Sunday, Nov. 15 at 2 p.m. at the Michigan City Public Library, 100 E. Fourth St. in Michigan City, through a collaboration between Purdue University North Central’s Odyssey Arts and Cultural Events Series and Michigan City Public Library. The showing is free and open to the public. The movie is rated PG.

“Mr. Holmes” is an adaptation of the Mitch Cullin 2005 novel “A Slight Trick of the Mind.” It stars Ian McKellen as Sherlock Holmes; Laura Linney as Mrs. Munro and Milo Parker as her son Roger. The film is a look at the genius detective in his old age as he spends his days in his country home, living quietly with his cook, Mrs. Monro and her son, Roger. At age 93, Holmes is working hard to restore his slipping mind. He desperately wants to solve one case that has been perplexing him for years.

The films weaves between decades and continents as it follows Holmes and threads stories within stories.

“Variety” magazines describes McKellen as “predictably superb as Holmes” and Linney as “beautifully understated.” It terms “the filmmaking itself as among director Bill Condon’s most elegant.”

The Purdue University North Central Odyssey Arts and Cultural Events Series features various events throughout the year. A complete schedule of university events can be found at www.pnc.edu. For more information about this film, or any event in the Odyssey series, contact Judy Jacobi, PNC assistant vice chancellor of Marketing and Campus Relations, at 219-785-5593. Persons with disabilities requiring accommodations should contact Jacobi.

PNC 17th Odyssey Sculpture Show Debuts

Ody 17 LeadPurdue University North Central will celebrate opening of its 17th Odyssey Arts and Cultural Events Series with a public reception and opening of its multi-piece contemporary sculpture exhibit on Saturday, Nov. 7 in the Library-Student-Faculty Building Assembly Hall, Room 02.

The Odyssey 2015– 2016 exhibit includes eight new pieces bringing the total to 43 sculptures that grace the 269-acre PNC Westville campus and PNC – Porter County, 600 Vale Park Road in Valparaiso.

Guests are welcome to arrive early to take a self-guided tour of the sculptures located throughout the PNC Westville campus.

The opening will begin at 5 p.m. with refreshments. The program will begin at 5:30 with welcoming remarks from PNC Chancellor Dr. James B. Dworkin. Judy Jacobi, PNC assistant vice chancellor of Marketing and Campus Relations, will introduce the new exhibiting sculptors and artists, who will be on hand to discuss their works.

Dworkin will also be honored for his continuing support for the Odyssey series through his 15 years as PNC chancellor.

Following the Odyssey opening activities, from 6:30 to 7 p.m., guests are welcome to view the art on display at PNC. That includes the artwork of noted 20th century artist, George Sugarman which is located in the Library Odyssey Gallery on the second floor of the LSF Building. This collection includes sculptures, a variety of framed paintings, a tribute wall of 35 framed works, a montage of photographs depicting the artist and his biography. The library, usually closed on Saturdays, will be open from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m.

Zhou.border

Zhou Brothers

Guests may view “The Zhou Brothers Exhibit,” a collection of paintings, sculptures and terragraphs in the Library-Student-Faculty Building, Room 02. This collection was recently donated to Purdue North Central by Dr. Eugene D. and Dorothy A. Van Hove, of Carmel, Ind. It includes mixed media paintings, two sculptures and terragraphs displayed under glass.

Also open to the public is the exhibit, “An Outsider Looks In,” a collection of mixed-media paintings and sculpture by Thomas Olesker, in the Library-Student-Faulty Building student lounge, Room 062.

The exhibit “People and Places – Places and People,” featuring the work of photographer John Horwitz, is on display in the first floor north study area of the PNC Technology Building.

PNC is the permanent home of a section of a steel beam recovered from the World Trade Center in New York after its Sept. 11, 2001 collapse and is on display in the LSF Cybercafé, Room 114, off the first floor foyer.

The steel is displayed near the oil paintings of Jason Poteet, which includes a series named, “New York, New York,” created in tribute to the victims of Sept. 11, the rescue workers and the residents of New York City.

“Each year the Odyssey sculpture exhibit brings a breathtaking array of art to the campus,” said Jacobi, who has been the driving force behind the Odyssey Arts and Cultural Events Series since its inception. “I am extremely proud that the Odyssey series continues to be the largest outdoor art installation in our area and is one of the premier art installations in Indiana and lower Michigan. It has gained a tremendous reputation through the year and attracts visits from across the county. I invite the public to come to the Purdue North Central campus and spend some time with our sculptures.”

The Odyssey Cultural Series includes a number of events throughout the year, including exhibits of art, film showings and presentations.

Sculptors who will debut works as part of Odyssey 2015 – 2016 are:

Radiating

Radiating

Radiating by Ruth Aizuss Migdal. This sculpture measures 9 feet high by three feet wide and five feet deep. Created over a five-year period, it radiates the power of a prehistoric female goddess. It is made of bronze and gilded gold to be shiny forever to radiate the extreme power of being a woman.

Tales from the Woods by Christine Perri. This multi-piece installation is a collection of carved wood sculpture and paper objects that collectively express the origins of story-telling, fittingly positioned both inside and outside the PNC library. The outdoor sculpture installation, named Planter, is a carved wood sculpture that is six feet long. A sculpture located in the library features two carved wood sculptures, discarded library books, small painted logs and branches on a raised platform.

SUNK

SUNK

The Illustrated Facts of Global Warming: SUNK by Ken Thompson. This steel structure is 15.6 feet high, 9 feet wide and 9 feet deep. With polar caps melting, ocean levels rising, summers getting hotter and winters warmer, the earth is developing “super-storms.” This sculpture is presented in sympathy with the thousands of people affected by super-storm Sandy’s relentless devastation.

Thin Series: Off the Diet 3 by Ken Thompson. Thompson has a second sculpture that is made of steel, stainless steel and granite. This sculpture is 6 feet by 3 feet by 1.5 feet and concentrates on the fundamental issues of form and how negative space defines it using multiple “cut-out” pieces.

Ascension by Ray Katz. This sculpture of painted, bolted aluminum measures 13 feet high by 13 feet wide by 16.3 feet deep. Its implied energy is a metaphor for an evolutionary process associated with human experience. Through the creative process, elements become symbols of the shared transcendental experience and the experiences of life’s journey.

A trophy by Richard Kiebdaj. This high-solid polyurethane painted steel sculpture depicts frogs and other reptilian forms that have permeable skins and are susceptible to environmental changes, in this case, for the worse. The artist coveys that changes in the environment should not be ignored so that “we are not dancing ourselves into extinction.” The sculpture is 10 feet tall and sits on a 3 foot by 3 foot base.

Bird in a Tree

Bird in a Tree

Bird in a Tree (Cardinal on a Hashtag) by John Habela. This painted steel sculpture is an Indiana Bicentennial Legacy Project. It represents the journey Indiana has taken into the 20th century depicting the cardinal as Indiana’s majestic state bird, the hashtag a most recognizable icon of the current era and the tree representing the growth of Indiana for the past 200 years. The 2016 Indiana Bicentennial Commission has endorsed this sculpture as an Indiana Bicentennial Legacy Project.

Four Georgia by Barry Tinsley. This four-piece work is composed of steel, granite, ceramic, bronze and limestone. These pieces each represent four cities visited by Tinsley during a sculpture symposium in 1991 – Tbilisi, Kutaisi, Rustavig and Kakheti. They measure 5.5 feet by 7 feet by 7.5 feet.

The Odyssey sculpture exhibit is open to the public during university hours. Visitors are encouraged to come on Thursdays, Fridays and weekends when parking is ample.

Information on group tours is available by contacting Judy Jacobi, assistant vice chancellor of Marketing and Campus Relations at 219-785- 5593. Persons with disabilities requiring accommodations should contact Jacobi

PNC, Library Present Screening of “Ex Machina”

The movie “Ex Machina” will be shown on Sunday, Oct. 18 at 2 p.m. at the Michigan City Public Library, 100 E. Fourth St. in Michigan City, through a collaboration between Purdue University North Central’s Odyssey Arts and Cultural Events Series and Michigan City Public Library. The showing is free and open to the public. The movie is rated R.

Screenwriter Alex Garland makes his directing debut with “Ex Machina,” a science-fiction thriller. The story centers on the character Caleb Smith, played by Domhnall Gleeson, who is a coder working for Nathan Bateman, actor Oscar Isaac, who is portrayed as a twisted internet genius. The boss has plans for Caleb to travel to a remote lab in Alaska to participate in his twisted artificial intelligence experiment that includes an advanced species of robot in female form.

Actress Alicia Vikander stars as Ava the female robot. “Time” magazine lauded her performance, “Vikander lends Ava a grace and precision of movement that could be human or mechanical, earthly or ethereal. We can almost watch Ava’s mind work.”

While many films have depicted merciless men entrapping people for science or sport, this film takes a number of unanticipated twists and turns.

As “Rolling Stone” describes, “The less you know going into this mesmerizing mind-bender, the better. Ex Machina springs surprises that will haunt you for a good long time.”

The Purdue University North Central Odyssey Arts and Cultural Events Series features various events throughout the year. A complete schedule of university events can be found at www.pnc.edu. For more information about this film, or any event in the Odyssey series, contact Judy Jacobi, PNC assistant vice chancellor of Marketing and Campus Relations, at 219-785-5593. Persons with disabilities requiring accommodations should contact Jacobi.

PNC Presents “The Zhou Brothers Exhibit”

Zhou BrothersThe Purdue University North Central Odyssey Arts and Cultural Events Series is currently featuring “The Zhou Brothers Exhibit,” a collection of paintings, sculptures and terragraphs, in the PNC Library-Student-Faculty Building, Room 02 in the building’s lower level. It is free and is open to the public and may be viewed by appointment only. The exhibit will be up through May, 2016.

This collection was recently donated to Purdue North Central by Dr. Eugene D. and Dorothy A. Van Hove, of Carmel, Ind.

The exhibit includes mixed media paintings, two sculptures and terragraphs displayed under glass. The terragraphs have been created using a process that utilizes sands from the Negev Desert to create dramatic textures. The sand is rinsed, neutralized and mixed with resins to permit flexibility and stability. The sand is coated with a translucent layer of ink to allow the sand to retain its natural color. The result is richly colored graphics of high-relief textures that cannot be achieved with screen printing. This group of terragraphs is reminiscent of ancient Chinese cave paintings.

The Zhou Brothers work as a unique collaborative, forming what critics have called “our most accomplished contemporary Chinese-American artists.” After surviving the Chinese Cultural Revolution, from 1966 to 1976, they were the first artists to exhibit abstract art in China. Zhou 1

Before leaving China in 1986, the brothers were nationally recognized contemporary artists with shows in the National Museum of Art, Beijing; the Museum of Art, Nanjing; the Shanghai Museum of Art; the Guiling Art Museum; and the Guanxi Art Museum in Nanning.

The brothers have achieved international acclaim with shows in the United States and Europe. Their work is in galleries and private collections around the globe.

The Zhou Brothers live and work in the Bridgeport neighborhood of Chicago. In 2004 they purchased an 87,000 square-foot former industrial building and transformed it into what is known today as the Zhou B Art Center. The Center provides studio and exhibition space for more than 50 artist residencies and their work. It hosts at least 10 exhibitions a year and has hosted and curated more than 160 major exhibitions in the past 10 years.

To schedule an appointment to view this exhibit or to obtain further information, contact Judy Jacobi, PNC assistant vice chancellor of Marketing and Campus Relations, at 219-785-5593. Persons with disabilities requiring accommodations should contact Jacobi.

PNC Presents “People and Places – Places and People”

The Purdue University North Central Odyssey Arts and Cultural Events Series will present the exhibit “People and Places – Places and People” featuring the work of photographer John Horwitz in the first floor, north study area of the PNC Technology Building. It is free and open to the public.

Building hours are Monday through Friday, 7 a.m. to 11 p.m.; Saturday, 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday, 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. during the school semester; otherwise the building is closed on Sunday.

Horowitz PR2The exhibit will feature “People and Places” through December, concentrating on photographs of cities and buildings. It will transition to “Places and People” in January and continue through May and features photographs of people.

Horwitz is the president of the Northern Indiana Artists Association, is director of the Washington Street Gallery and curator of City Market Studios and Gallery. His work has been included in exhibits that include the Art Institute of Chicago, the Guggenheim, the Carnegie Center for the Arts, CBS TV in New York, the Lubeznik Center for the Arts in Michigan City and many other galleries across the county.

He explained his inspiration for his work, “Before you look at the photographs there is a story that needs to be told about the pieces that are in front of you. We often see a final image and are struck by the color, light or texture of a world interpreted by the artist. It may be real, surreal, an abstraction or an impression. We compare it to the experience itself and decide if it is truth or beauty, brutal reality or unjustly critical. It is in this end result of a lifetime of learning and a continued quest for understanding that we stand and gaze at a photograph, canvas or sculpture and wonder what brought this work together as we see it.

“I have always been fascinated by the ability of photography to show minute detail and puzzled by those who are unable to see that it can also be a serenely soft media, not only hiding our faults but becoming a fantasy as well. This compelling dichotomy is an inspiration and completes all of my visions.190

“The camera is fully capable of exactly reproducing whatever is placed before it and anyone skilled in image enhancement would find scarce challenge in manipulating an image; but in what context should this or any other embellishment be done?

“I have always felt that photography has been used too often to simply document our lives and the inherent creativity of the medium has been overlooked or dismissed as ‘easy’ when compared to more traditional art forms. It is a process whose many practitioners debate form or content yet rarely achieve technical competence or aesthetic clarity. It is my desire to find a balance between these two cognitive contents and a deep and meaningful personal expression. In this context my work continues to evolve, encompassing abstract and formal ideation.”

For information about this exhibit or the Odyssey Arts and Cultural Events Series, contact Judy Jacobi, PNC assistant vice chancellor of Marketing and Campus Relations, at 219-785-5593. Persons with disabilities requiring accommodations should contact Jacobi.

PNC, Library Present Screening of “Love and Mercy”

The movie “Love and Mercy” will be shown on Sunday, Sept. 20 at 2 p.m. at the Michigan City Public Library, 100 E. Fourth St. in Michigan City, through a collaboration between Purdue University North Central’s Odyssey Arts and Cultural Events Series and Michigan City Public Library. The showing is free and open to the public. The movie is rated PG13.

This film is based on the life of Brian Wilson, an extremely talented and deeply troubled member of the Beach Boys, considered to be among the most significant of American rock ’n’ roll bands. Actor Paul Dano plays a young Brian Wilson and John Cusack portrays the older Wilson.

Wilson was known to lead dazzling and confounding recording sessions as the Beach Boys soared in popularity in the 1960s. But in 1973, he became a recluse, having experienced a creative breakdown, a long descent into drug use and the death of his father. His father had sold Wilson’s music rights away for less than a million dollars, explaining that “five years from now no one is going to remember you or the Beach Boys.”

Wilson resurfaced in 1975, after he had been incorrectly diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia while in the care of controversial therapist named Eugene Landy. Landy would manage and question Wilson’s every move for the next decade. The Wilson family and Wilson’s girlfriend, Melinda Ledbetter, who later became his wife, finally won a court order that separated Wilson from Landy. Wilson, who was later found to have bipolar schizoaffective disorder, was said to have a distinctly different personality before and after his years in seclusion.

“The Hollywood Reporter” notes that in this movie, “John Cusack gives one of the best performances of his career, its effectiveness limited only by his lack of a physical resemblance to the songwriter. That will be a stumbling block for some fans, but those who can get beyond it will find a very fine film about a singular artist.”

The Purdue University North Central Odyssey Arts and Cultural Events Series features various events throughout the year. A complete schedule of university events can be found at www.pnc.edu. For more information about this film, or any event in the Odyssey series, contact Judy Jacobi, PNC assistant vice chancellor of Marketing and Campus Relations, at 219-785-5593. Persons with disabilities requiring accommodations should contact Jacobi.

Students Mix Art with Science in STEM Summer Camp @ PNC, 2013

PNC STEM Group with Breeze Keeper

PNC STEM Camp students with “Breeze Keeper”

The  area students taking part in the Purdue University North Central STEM Summer  Camp @ PNC, 2013 are gaining a first-hand look at how Science, Technology, Engineering  and Mathematics (the STEM disciplines) are vital to their lives and a  fundamental component of most everything they do.

The six-week  camp brings young people, ages six to 12, to the PNC campus as part of the  summer programming for the La Porte County Coalition of Youth Serving Agencies (YSA)  including Imagination Station, Boys and Girls Club, Michigan City Parks and  Recreation, Safe Harbor and Barker Woods. The camp’s primary underwriter is 21st  Century Community Learning Centers grant.

Each group  travels to PNC one morning a week for six weeks, with each week featuring a  different theme exploring a different aspect of the STEM disciplines. With the  entire PNC campus serving as a classroom, PNC faculty, staff and local  professionals serve as instructors, presenting age-appropriate learning activities  for the students. For many, the camp represents their first opportunity to  visit to a college campus.

The camp includes  this week’s activity, “Kinetic Art: Making Mobiles” with Holly Beadles, an art  Instructor with the Michigan City Area Schools. NIPSCO is sponsoring this week’s  activities.
Beadles centers  her activities on learning about kinetic art and how wind interacts with it.  Students will make a mobile using wire, card stock and some other things.  They will study examples of artist Alexander  Calder’s work.

The newly  installed sculpture, “Breeze Keeper,” by Christine Rojek will be used as  another example of how winds and nature can be incorporated into art.  |

The STEM camp  activities provide an exceptional week of learning by highly qualified  instructors on a college campus.   Learning experiences such as these change lives.  Through its sponsorship, NIPSCO has helped to  enrich the lives of the participating children.

The camp curricula also features:
Dr. Kumara Jayasuriya, associate vice  chancellor for Academic Affairs and associate professor of Mathematics, leading  campers through “Fun with Numbers.”
Dr. Diane Spoljoric, PNC associate  professor of Nursing, with “Healthy Choices for Life.”
Jerry DeGroot, PNC continuing lecturer in  Mathematics, with “Humerus Metric Measurements & a Few Good Belly Graphs.”
Joan Wisniewski, president of the Potawatomi  Audubon Society, and members of the Potawatomi Audubon Society will present  “Tree Structure.”
Dr. Aaron Warren, PNC associate professor of  Physics, with “Stars and Galaxies.”

PNC 14th Anniversary Odyssey Sculpture Show Debuts

 

Tricycle Art

Tricycle Art

Tres Bon Tricycle is the sculptural folk art work of a team from Hendricks & Associates and Lonici Rental Group

Purdue University North Central celebrates the 14 th anniversary of its Odyssey Arts and Cultural Events Series with a public reception and opening of its multi-piece contemporary sculpture exhibit on Saturday, Oct. 20, from 5 to 6:30 p.m. in the Library-Student-Faculty Building Assembly Hall, Room 02.

The Odyssey 2012 – 2013 exhibit includes six new pieces bringing the total to 38 sculptures that grace the 268-acre campus of the PNC Westville campus and PNC – Porter County, 600 Vale Park Road in Valparaiso.

Guests are welcome to arrive early to take a self-guided tour of the sculptures located throughout the PNC Westville campus.

In the Assembly Hall, refreshments and conversation will be from 5 to 5:30 p.m. Remarks by PNC Chancellor Dr. James B. Dworkin and Judy Jacobi, assistant vice chancellor of Marketing and Campus Relations, will begin at 5:30. This year’s debuting Odyssey sculptors and artists will be on hand to discuss their works.

Following the Odyssey opening activities, guests are welcome to view the art currently on display at PNC. This includes the exhibits “Over the Rainbow” by Ed Levitin, in the Library-Student-Faculty Building student lounge, Room 062 and “The Art of Otto Neumann: Fifty Years of His Work” on display in Assembly Hall.

“A Salute to Sugarman,” a multi-piece work by fourth and fifth graders from Pine Elementary, Michigan City’s Magnet School for the Visual and Performing Arts, is in the Technology Building north s tudy lounge. That building will be open until 7:30 p.m.

The artwork of noted 20 th century artist, George Sugarman is located in the Library Odyssey Gallery on the second floor of the LSF Building. This collection includes sculptures, a variety of framed paintings, a tribute wall of 35 framed works, a montage of photographs depicting the artist and his biography. The library, usually closed on Saturdays, will be open from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m.

PNC is the permanent home of a section of a steel beam recovered from the World Trade Center in New York after its Sept. 11, 2001 collapse and is on display in the LSF Cybercafé, Room 114, off the first floor foyer.

The steel is displayed near the oil paintings of Jason Poteet, which includes a series named, “New York, New York,” created in tribute to the victims of Sept. 11, the rescue workers and the residents of New York City.

S. Thomas Scarff, in his 14th year as curator of the PNC Odyssey sculpture exhibits, remarks, “ The Odyssey series is the largest outdoor art installation in our area and is one of the premier art installations in Northwest Indiana and lower Michigan. This year’s works combine creative impulses, great engineering and a sense of humor in many cases.”

The Odyssey Cultural Series includes a number of events throughout the year, including exhibits of art, film showings and presentations.

Sculptors who will debut works as part of Odyssey 2012 – 2013 are:

Adrian Calderon – “ Wing of Progress” is a raw steel sculpture that measures 12-feet by 9-feet by 3-feet. It was inspired by the standards, mentality, aesthetics and values of the 1920s through the 1940’s.

Ben Woitena – “Oasis” has a plant- or tree-like quality. Made of painted steel, this sculpture is 13-feet high by 6-feet wide by 7.5-feet deep.

Ben Woitena – “Night Sea Passage” is another painted steel sculpture. Measuring 10-feet by 20-feet by 6-feet, the elements of this black and red painted steel work are composed of diamond shapes, complete and incomplete.

Charles Yost – “ Splatted Totem with Piece Pipes” embodies both geometric and organic elements, forming a “georganimetric” concept. Made of welded stainless steel and milled steel, with a powder coat paint surface, it stands 12-feet high, 4-feet wide and 4-feet deep. Its curvilinear, organic-like shapes are juxtaposed with the harder edged forms and color is added where whimsy dictates.

George Tobolowsky – “ the rough red road to a start-up” represents putting together a business plan and trying to raise the capital needed to start a new company. Red paint represents the “negative cash flow.” The 10-foot by 12-foot by 5-foot piece is composed of found metal objects – bulky industrial castoffs scoured from scrap yards and fabrication plants.

Charles Hendricks & Associates and Lonici Rental Group – “Tres Bon Tricycle” is a functioning, large-scale – 14-foot by 11-foot by 18-foot painted steel tricycle in the spirit of the railroad velocipede with reverence for the simple childhood years. Its uncomplicated design and basic red and white colors are reminiscent of the fun, carefree childhood days.

Existing Odyssey pieces are:

John Adduci – Running Arch, Odysseus

Ron Gard – The Struggle Against Death

Mike Grucza – Odalisque

Jason Hawk – Don’t Panic, The World Isn’t Flat

Preston Jackson – Haints + History, Travels of My Seven Sisters

Kara James – Tongue Highway

Terry Karpowicz – Heraldic Taunt at PNC – Porter County

Dessa Kirk – Demeter

Michele Lanning – Oh!

Michele Lanning – Critical Mass in the PNC Library

Rob Lorenson – First Gear, Sentinel

Brian Monaghan – Untitled

David Noguchi – Rise, at PNC – Porter County

Eric Nordgulen – Anatomy Vessel

Jason Poteet – Rumination

Fisher Stolz – Seduction

S. Thomas Scarff – Geisha Rose, Rainbow Flyer, Windfighter ; at PNC – Porter County are Light Ray, Indigo Flame

George Sugarman – A Green Field, Two Part Folding Screen and Two Blues and a Red

Jason Verbeek – Dragonfly

Zelda Werner – Alexander’s Circus

Bruce White – Ghostship, Twin Fin Continuum

Jaci Willis Effervescence

A number of works are for sale.

The Odyssey sculpture exhibit is open to the public during university hours. Visitors are encouraged to come on Thursdays, Fridays and weekends when parking is ample.

For self-guided sculpture tour maps and additional information about Odyssey 2012 – 2013 visit www.artatpnc.com. Information on group tours is available by contacting Judy Jacobi, assistant vice chancellor of Marketing and Campus Relations at 785-5200, ext. 5593. Persons with disabilities requiring accommodations should contact Jacobi.