Students Mix Art with Science in STEM Summer Camp @ PNC, 2013

PNC STEM Group with Breeze Keeper

PNC STEM Camp students with “Breeze Keeper”

The  area students taking part in the Purdue University North Central STEM Summer  Camp @ PNC, 2013 are gaining a first-hand look at how Science, Technology, Engineering  and Mathematics (the STEM disciplines) are vital to their lives and a  fundamental component of most everything they do.

The six-week  camp brings young people, ages six to 12, to the PNC campus as part of the  summer programming for the La Porte County Coalition of Youth Serving Agencies (YSA)  including Imagination Station, Boys and Girls Club, Michigan City Parks and  Recreation, Safe Harbor and Barker Woods. The camp’s primary underwriter is 21st  Century Community Learning Centers grant.

Each group  travels to PNC one morning a week for six weeks, with each week featuring a  different theme exploring a different aspect of the STEM disciplines. With the  entire PNC campus serving as a classroom, PNC faculty, staff and local  professionals serve as instructors, presenting age-appropriate learning activities  for the students. For many, the camp represents their first opportunity to  visit to a college campus.

The camp includes  this week’s activity, “Kinetic Art: Making Mobiles” with Holly Beadles, an art  Instructor with the Michigan City Area Schools. NIPSCO is sponsoring this week’s  activities.
Beadles centers  her activities on learning about kinetic art and how wind interacts with it.  Students will make a mobile using wire, card stock and some other things.  They will study examples of artist Alexander  Calder’s work.

The newly  installed sculpture, “Breeze Keeper,” by Christine Rojek will be used as  another example of how winds and nature can be incorporated into art.  |

The STEM camp  activities provide an exceptional week of learning by highly qualified  instructors on a college campus.   Learning experiences such as these change lives.  Through its sponsorship, NIPSCO has helped to  enrich the lives of the participating children.

The camp curricula also features:
Dr. Kumara Jayasuriya, associate vice  chancellor for Academic Affairs and associate professor of Mathematics, leading  campers through “Fun with Numbers.”
Dr. Diane Spoljoric, PNC associate  professor of Nursing, with “Healthy Choices for Life.”
Jerry DeGroot, PNC continuing lecturer in  Mathematics, with “Humerus Metric Measurements & a Few Good Belly Graphs.”
Joan Wisniewski, president of the Potawatomi  Audubon Society, and members of the Potawatomi Audubon Society will present  “Tree Structure.”
Dr. Aaron Warren, PNC associate professor of  Physics, with “Stars and Galaxies.”

PNC 14th Anniversary Odyssey Sculpture Show Debuts

 

Tricycle Art

Tricycle Art

Tres Bon Tricycle is the sculptural folk art work of a team from Hendricks & Associates and Lonici Rental Group

Purdue University North Central celebrates the 14 th anniversary of its Odyssey Arts and Cultural Events Series with a public reception and opening of its multi-piece contemporary sculpture exhibit on Saturday, Oct. 20, from 5 to 6:30 p.m. in the Library-Student-Faculty Building Assembly Hall, Room 02.

The Odyssey 2012 – 2013 exhibit includes six new pieces bringing the total to 38 sculptures that grace the 268-acre campus of the PNC Westville campus and PNC – Porter County, 600 Vale Park Road in Valparaiso.

Guests are welcome to arrive early to take a self-guided tour of the sculptures located throughout the PNC Westville campus.

In the Assembly Hall, refreshments and conversation will be from 5 to 5:30 p.m. Remarks by PNC Chancellor Dr. James B. Dworkin and Judy Jacobi, assistant vice chancellor of Marketing and Campus Relations, will begin at 5:30. This year’s debuting Odyssey sculptors and artists will be on hand to discuss their works.

Following the Odyssey opening activities, guests are welcome to view the art currently on display at PNC. This includes the exhibits “Over the Rainbow” by Ed Levitin, in the Library-Student-Faculty Building student lounge, Room 062 and “The Art of Otto Neumann: Fifty Years of His Work” on display in Assembly Hall.

“A Salute to Sugarman,” a multi-piece work by fourth and fifth graders from Pine Elementary, Michigan City’s Magnet School for the Visual and Performing Arts, is in the Technology Building north s tudy lounge. That building will be open until 7:30 p.m.

The artwork of noted 20 th century artist, George Sugarman is located in the Library Odyssey Gallery on the second floor of the LSF Building. This collection includes sculptures, a variety of framed paintings, a tribute wall of 35 framed works, a montage of photographs depicting the artist and his biography. The library, usually closed on Saturdays, will be open from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m.

PNC is the permanent home of a section of a steel beam recovered from the World Trade Center in New York after its Sept. 11, 2001 collapse and is on display in the LSF Cybercafé, Room 114, off the first floor foyer.

The steel is displayed near the oil paintings of Jason Poteet, which includes a series named, “New York, New York,” created in tribute to the victims of Sept. 11, the rescue workers and the residents of New York City.

S. Thomas Scarff, in his 14th year as curator of the PNC Odyssey sculpture exhibits, remarks, “ The Odyssey series is the largest outdoor art installation in our area and is one of the premier art installations in Northwest Indiana and lower Michigan. This year’s works combine creative impulses, great engineering and a sense of humor in many cases.”

The Odyssey Cultural Series includes a number of events throughout the year, including exhibits of art, film showings and presentations.

Sculptors who will debut works as part of Odyssey 2012 – 2013 are:

Adrian Calderon – “ Wing of Progress” is a raw steel sculpture that measures 12-feet by 9-feet by 3-feet. It was inspired by the standards, mentality, aesthetics and values of the 1920s through the 1940′s.

Ben Woitena – “Oasis” has a plant- or tree-like quality. Made of painted steel, this sculpture is 13-feet high by 6-feet wide by 7.5-feet deep.

Ben Woitena – “Night Sea Passage” is another painted steel sculpture. Measuring 10-feet by 20-feet by 6-feet, the elements of this black and red painted steel work are composed of diamond shapes, complete and incomplete.

Charles Yost – “ Splatted Totem with Piece Pipes” embodies both geometric and organic elements, forming a “georganimetric” concept. Made of welded stainless steel and milled steel, with a powder coat paint surface, it stands 12-feet high, 4-feet wide and 4-feet deep. Its curvilinear, organic-like shapes are juxtaposed with the harder edged forms and color is added where whimsy dictates.

George Tobolowsky – “ the rough red road to a start-up” represents putting together a business plan and trying to raise the capital needed to start a new company. Red paint represents the “negative cash flow.” The 10-foot by 12-foot by 5-foot piece is composed of found metal objects – bulky industrial castoffs scoured from scrap yards and fabrication plants.

Charles Hendricks & Associates and Lonici Rental Group – “Tres Bon Tricycle” is a functioning, large-scale – 14-foot by 11-foot by 18-foot painted steel tricycle in the spirit of the railroad velocipede with reverence for the simple childhood years. Its uncomplicated design and basic red and white colors are reminiscent of the fun, carefree childhood days.

Existing Odyssey pieces are:

John Adduci – Running Arch, Odysseus

Ron Gard – The Struggle Against Death

Mike Grucza – Odalisque

Jason Hawk – Don’t Panic, The World Isn’t Flat

Preston Jackson – Haints + History, Travels of My Seven Sisters

Kara James – Tongue Highway

Terry Karpowicz – Heraldic Taunt at PNC – Porter County

Dessa Kirk – Demeter

Michele Lanning – Oh!

Michele Lanning – Critical Mass in the PNC Library

Rob Lorenson – First Gear, Sentinel

Brian Monaghan – Untitled

David Noguchi – Rise, at PNC – Porter County

Eric Nordgulen – Anatomy Vessel

Jason Poteet – Rumination

Fisher Stolz – Seduction

S. Thomas Scarff – Geisha Rose, Rainbow Flyer, Windfighter ; at PNC – Porter County are Light Ray, Indigo Flame

George Sugarman – A Green Field, Two Part Folding Screen and Two Blues and a Red

Jason Verbeek – Dragonfly

Zelda Werner – Alexander’s Circus

Bruce White – Ghostship, Twin Fin Continuum

Jaci Willis Effervescence

A number of works are for sale.

The Odyssey sculpture exhibit is open to the public during university hours. Visitors are encouraged to come on Thursdays, Fridays and weekends when parking is ample.

For self-guided sculpture tour maps and additional information about Odyssey 2012 – 2013 visit www.artatpnc.com. Information on group tours is available by contacting Judy Jacobi, assistant vice chancellor of Marketing and Campus Relations at 785-5200, ext. 5593. Persons with disabilities requiring accommodations should contact Jacobi.

PNC 13th Anniversary Odyssey Sculpture Show Debuts

Purdue University North Central celebrates the 13 th anniversary of its Odyssey Arts and Cultural Events Series with a public opening and reception of its multi-piece contemporary sculpture exhibit on Saturday, Oct. 22, from 5 to 6:30 p.m. in the Library-Student-Faculty Building Assembly Hall, Room 02.

Visitors to campus are welcome to arrive early to take a self-guided tour of the 35 sculptures located throughout the PNC Westville campus.

In Assembly Hall, refreshments and conversation will begin at 5 p.m. Remarks by PNC Chancellor Dr. James B. Dworkin and Judy Jacobi, assistant vice chancellor of Marketing and Campus Relations, will begin at 5:30. Jacobi will introduce this year’s Odyssey sculptors and their sculptures. A number of the exhibiting sculptors and artists will be on hand to speak about their work. Refreshments will be served.

Following the Odyssey opening activities, guests are welcome to view the art currently on display at PNC. This includes the exhibits “Expressions in Watercolor” by Pat Lansford, in the Library-Student-Faculty Building student lounge, Room 062 and “The Surreal Art of Science by Jack Harris” in Assembly Hall. “Illuminations & Explorations: Drawings of the Aurora Borealis” by Olivia Petrides, is in the Technology Building first floor north study lounge. That building will be open until 7:30 p.m.

PNC is the permanent home of a section of a steel beam recovered from the World Trade Center in New York, after its Sept. 11, 2001 collapse. It is displayed in the LSF Cybercafé, Room 114, off the first floor foyer.

The artwork of noted 20 th century artist, George Sugarman is on display in the Library Odyssey Gallery on the second floor of the LSF Building. This collection includes sculptures, a variety of framed paintings, a tribute wall of 35 framed works, a montage of photographs depicting the artist and his biography. The library, usually closed on Saturdays, will be open from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m.

The Odyssey 2011 –2012 exhibit includes four new pieces bringing the total to 35 sculptures that grace the 268-acre campus of the PNC Westville campus and PNC – Porter County, 600 Vale Park Road in Valparaiso.

S. Thomas Scarff, in his 13th year as curator of the PNC Odyssey sculpture exhibits, remarks, “The Odyssey series is the largest outdoor art installation in our area and it is one of the premier art installations in Northwest Indiana and Lower Michigan. The exhibit offers breathtaking, dynamic and thought-provoking pieces that cannot be seen elsewhere. I invite everyone to come out to enjoy this unique exhibit.”

The Odyssey Cultural Series also includes a number of events throughout the year, including exhibits of art, film showings and presentations.

Sculptors who will debut works as part of Odyssey 2011 – 12 are:

Ron Gard – “The Struggle Against Death” is a stainless steel and bronze sculpture measuring 9-feet by 3-feet by 4-feet. The title is an excerpt from the anonymous quote, “ All the Arts and Sciences have their roots in the struggle against death.”  Guard interprets that to mean that everyone’s aspirations strive to transcend mortality. He dedicated this piece to his recently deceased brother who has already transcended his own mortality. “In this piece, my hand for his, I hope to have made something that will pay appropriate tribute to him,” said Gard.

Mike Grucza – “ Lake Street Lovely” measures 15-feet by 9-feet by 9-feet and is composed of powder -coated and painted aluminum, and stainless steel hardware. This was inspired by the artist’s love for structures built of steel and rivets, such as those of the Chicago bridges and rail lines, and it is his homage to ironworkers. Grucza enjoys using steel in its simplest form and exploring the beauty of ironwork. The sculpture’s bright colors and figurative qualities emerged from his fascination with primitive art and children’s drawings and toys.

Jason Hawk – “ Don’t Panic, The World Isn’t Flat.” This sculpture is made of concrete and polychrome steel and measures 8 -feet by 2-feet by 7-feet. The artist explained that he intends for t his piece to serve as the catalyst for viewers to create a unique narrative. His work is driven by simple joys and beauties found in everyday life. But he also intends for the work to evoke a critique on society’s values and hang-ups. He asks, “What will people think they when look back at our society in a thousand years? Will they laugh or will they cast down their eyes in shame?”

Jaci Willis – “ Effervescence” is a stainless steel and glass piece measuring 10-feet by 8-feet by 12-feet. Effervescence” conveys life’s twists and turns and the artist’s elation of finding what her journey in life was about. She expresses the currents that run through life as waves running through a spiral. The spiral is a symbol for life’s continuous and ever-flowing journey. Small rings are a reminder of bubbles in the water. In some rings, blue glass symbolizes that life is a spiritual journey and we are all in this together. Never be afraid to jump in.

Existing Odyssey pieces are:

John Adduci – Running Arch, Odysseus

Joseph Colosi – San Pier Niceto

Dusty Folwarczny – Give

Michele Lanning – Oh! 

Mike Grucza – Odalisque

Preston Jackson – Haints + History, Travels of My Seven Sisters

Kara James – Tongue Highway

Terry Karpowicz – Heraldic Taunt at PNC – Porter County

Dessa Kirk – Demeter

Michele Lanning – Critical Mass

Travis Lanning – Progression

Rob Lorenson – First Gear, Sentinel

David Noguchi – Rise, at PNC – Porter County

Eric Nordgulen – Anatomy Vessel

Jason Poteet – Rumination

Fisher Stolz – Seduction

S. Thomas Scarff – Geisha Rose, Rainbow Flyer, Windfighter ; at PNC – Porter County are Light Ray, Indigo Flame

George Sugarman – A Green Field, Two Part Folding Screen and Two Blues and a Red

Jason Verbeek – Dragonfly

Zelda Werner – Alexander’s Circus

Bruce White – Ghostship, Twin Fin Continuum

A number of works are for sale.

The Odyssey sculpture exhibit is open to the public during university hours. Visitors are encouraged to come on Thursdays and Fridays when parking is ample.

Self-guided sculpture tour maps can be downloaded at www.pnc.edu/odyssey/flyer.pdf . The Web site for the Odyssey 2011-12 sculpture exhibit is www.pnc.edu/odyssey. Information on group tours is available by contacting Judy Jacobi, assistant vice chancellor of Marketing and Campus Relations at 785-5200, ext. 5593. Persons with disabilities requiring accommodations should contact Jacobi.

PNC 12th Anniversary Odyssey Sculpture Show Debuts

Purdue University North Central celebrates the 12th anniversary of its Odyssey Arts and Cultural Events Series with a public opening and reception of its multi-piece contemporary sculpture exhibit on Saturday, Oct. 23, from 5 to 6:30 p.m. in the Library-Student-Faculty Building Assembly Hall, Room 02.

Beginning at 5:30 p.m., there will be welcoming remarks by PNC Chancellor Dr. James B. Dworkin and Judy Jacobi, assistant vice chancellor of Marketing and Community Relations, along with comments from the sculptors and artists. Refreshments will be served.

The Odyssey 2010 –2011 exhibit includes eight new pieces bringing the total to 36 sculptures that grace the 268-acre campus of the PNC Westville campus and PNC – Porter County, 600 Vale Park Road in Valparaiso.

S. Thomas Scarff, in his 12th year as curator of the PNC Odyssey sculpture exhibits, remarks, “The Odyssey series is a tremendous asset to Purdue North Central and to our community. We are fortunate to have this beautiful outdoor sculpture installation – the largest in the area. Each year we bring together beautiful, dynamic, thought-provoking pieces from notable emerging and established artists. I invite everyone to come out to enjoy this unique exhibition and get to know these breathtaking works of art.”

The Odyssey Cultural Series also includes a number of events throughout the year, including exhibits of art, film showings and presentations.

PNC continues as the home of the artwork of noted 20 th century artist, George Sugarman. This collection includes sculptures, a variety of framed paintings and a tribute wall of 35 framed works, a montage of photographs depicting the artist and his biography. These are on display in the Library Odyssey Gallery on the second floor of the LSF Building.

PNC has loaned a number of pieces from the Sugarman collection to the Porter County Visiting Nurses Association in Valparaiso. Sixty-four large acrylics, collages and lithographs grace offices, hallways, meeting rooms, conference rooms and training rooms. The sculpture, Earth Bird, resides in the board room. A tour can be arranged by contacting the VNA at 219-462-5195.

Sculptors who will debut works as part of Odyssey 2010 – 11 are:

Joseph Colosi – “San Pier Niceto,” is a sculpture made of corten steel, tumbled granite, paint and metal halide lighting. Colosi explains this piece was inspired by his recent trip to his ancestral town in Sicily, San Pier Niceto. The piece is 15-feet tall, 4-feet wide and 3-feet deep and fabricated from 1 inch corten steel. Its pattern was taken directly from the inside of the trunk that carried his great-grandparent’s possessions to America.

Dusty Folwarczny – “Give,” a 14-foot by 14-foot by 5-foot sculpture made of salvaged steel and polymer. This brightly colored interactive sculpture which explores the act of giving can be described as a transfer of energy from one person to another. Viewers are welcomed inside to experience its mass. Once inside one may interact with it, push against it, whisper in the right spot and it is carried to the other side of this arch.

Michael L. Grucza – “BOING!,” this sculpture of steel plate with catalyzed polyurethane paint was inspired by Grucza’s interest in using steel in unexpected structural ways with simple bends, as a child might do with a sheet of paper and by his love of bold use of color. This 8-foot by 8-foot by 11-foot sculpture invites people to explore its visual, tactile, acoustic and architectural elements. When touched or pulled, the spirals produce a subtle ‘BOING!’ sound.

Richard Kiebdaj – “Owl and Pussycat,” this 11-foot by 5-foot by 5-foot piece is made of steel with macropoxy paint. It pays homage to Edward Lear, best known for his children’s poems and limericks and an accomplished artist as well. His cat and trusted companion, “Foss,” died in 1886, a year before Lear published “The Owl and the Pussycat.”

Michele Lanning – “Critical Mass,” a 4-foot tall sculpture made out of No. 2 pencils and wood. Lanning explains, “In working with different scales and mediums I am involved in exploring objects and our relationship with them. By exploiting and layering our associations to materials and objects, I seek to expand our conventional understandings to convey an alternative attachment.”

Travis Lanning – “Progression” is a bronze sculpture measuring 7-feet by 4-feet by 1.5-feet. It is a combination of the forms and textures of both bricks and LEGO pieces. This was inspired by his impression that brick structures reminded him of the countless, childhood hours spent playing with LEGOs.

Brian Monaghan – “Untitled” is made of painted curved steel beams stands 15 feet tall. Placement of its beams appear to give it a random design. It is not random at all. Untitled, represents an aspect of our time and harkens back to abstract expressionism in a three-dimensional form.

Jason Verbeek – “Dragonfly,” is a 10-foot by 25-foot by 25-foot sculpture of carbon steel and polished stainless steel depicting a dragonfly chained to a 6-foot mound of dirt, pulling up the earth to reveal wetlands. By pulling it up, a pool is created around this mound. The plants used in this piece – turf grass, wetland plants like Cardinal Flower, pickerel, bulrush, common arrowhead, swamp milkweed and native sedges – are recycled from Red Mill Pond, near PNC, where Verbeek is doing a job for the Army Corps of Engineers.

Existing Odyssey pieces are:

John Adduci – Running Arch, Odysseus

Michele Goldstrom – Oh!

Mike Helbing –Victory at Samothrace

Preston Jackson – Haints + History, Travels of My Seven Sisters

Kara James – Handmade Revolution, Tongue Highway

Terry Karpowicz – Heraldic Taunt at PNC – Porter County

Dessa Kirk – Demeter

Rob Lorenson – First Gear, Sentinel

David Noguchi – Rise, at PNC – Porter County

Eric Nordgulen – Anatomy Vessel

Jason Poteet – Rumination

Fisher Stolz – Seduction

S. Thomas Scarff – Geisha Rose, Rainbow Flyer, Drive- – - By, Windfighter ; at PNC – Porter County are Light Ray, Indigo Flame

George Sugarman – A Green Field, Two Part Folding Screen and Two Blues and a Red; Earth Bird is located at the Porter County VNA

Zelda Werner – Alexander’s Circus

Bruce White – Ghostship, Twin Fin Continuum

Most works are for sale.

The Odyssey sculpture exhibit is open to the public during university hours. Visitors are encouraged to come on Thursdays and Fridays when parking is ample.

Self-guided sculpture tour maps can be downloaded at www.pnc.edu/odyssey/flyer.pdf . The Web site for the Odyssey 2010-11 sculpture exhibit is www.pnc.edu/odyssey. Information on group tours is available by contacting Judy Jacobi, assistant vice chancellor of Marketing and Community Relations at 785-5200, ext. 5593. Persons with disabilities requiring accommodations should contact Jacobi.

PNC Is New Home of the George Sugarman Collection

 Purdue University North Central is the new home to hundreds of pieces of art created by noted 20 th century artist, George Sugarman. Earlier this year, The George Sugarman Foundation made the generous contribution of the definitive collection.

Sugarman, born in 1912 in the Bronx, New York City , was a prolific, controversial, and forward-thinking American artist. The PNC collection includes sculpture, paintings, photos, books and a video of pieces of Sugarman’s original art. Selected works will debut at PNC as part of the 2008-09 Odyssey Arts and Cultural Events Series opening on Saturday, Oct. 11. All Sugarman exhibits are free and open to the public.

Selected paintings and the sculpture Earth Bird may be viewed in the PNC Library-Student-Faculty Building Assembly Hall, Room 02, through the end of 2008. To see this exhibit, call 219-785-5593 or 219-785-5719.

Two additional sculptures, a variety of framed paintings and a tribute wall will be featured in the PNC Library Odyssey Gallery on the second floor of the LSF Building. The tribute wall includes 35 framed works, a montage of photographs depicting the artist and his biography.

The gallery is open Monday to Thursday from 7:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m.; Friday, 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Saturday, 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.

Another sculpture, Two Blues and a Red, is on display on the first floor of Schwarz Hall, adjacent to the Chancellor’s Office, Room 137.

This collection contains more than 50 years of Sugarman’s work. “Purdue University North Central is indebted to the George Sugarman Foundation; to Sugarman’s niece and foundation director Arden Sugarman; and to artist Peter Capurso, his long-time assistant, for the gift of this definitive collection,” said Judy Jacobi, PNC assistant vice chancellor of Marketing and Community Relations. “It resides at PNC for the educational benefit and enjoyment of all.”

Sugarman’s works are among the collections in museums such as the Whitney Museum of American Art, in New York City ; the Art Institute, Chicago and the Fogg Museum at Harvard University .

His work reflects an intense interest in colors. The sculptures embrace a “polychrome profusion” of shape and space as defined by color. The abstract yet organic forms that characterized his style with their eccentricity and expansiveness reflected what he called the “existential disorder of life.” In the midst of a surge of interest in the stark minimalism of sculptural work in the 1960s, Sugarman persisted in his complex, multi-colored geometric and biomorphic style.

A 1934 graduate of the City College of New York, Sugarman served in the Navy from 1941 to 1945, assigned to the Pacific theater. He resumed his education in Paris , studying with cubist sculptor Ossip Zadkine. He returned to New York in 1955 at age 39 to begin his career as an artist.

His early sculptures were carved wood. He later used constructions. Influenced by such artists as Picasso, Matisse, Michelangelo, Archipenko and Baroque architecture.

In 1961, Sugarman was recognized by the international art community when he was awarded second prize for sculptural creativity in the Carnegie International Exhibition of Contemporary Painting and Sculpture. Alberto Giacometti and David Smith, giants of contemporary sculpture, won first and third prizes, respectively.

During the latter 30 years of his life, Sugarman created numerous large sculptures, most of which were commissioned for spaces in the United States , Europe, Australia and Asia . He was an early proponent of “public art”, encouraging the marriage of sculptural form with its outdoor or natural environment, as opposed to placing sculpture isolated indoors, in museums or galleries. He preferred his works to be placed upon the ground, without the formality of pedestals.

Sugarman was a visiting lecturer at Yale, among other colleges and visited many of them, including Purdue University in West Lafayette in 1975. When he died in 1999 at age 87, his family established the George Sugarman Foundation which helps support the work of emerging artists.

To obtain further information about the Sugarman collection or to arrange a tour, contact Judy Jacobi, PNC assistant vice chancellor of Marketing and Community Relations, at 219-785-5200 ext. 5593. Persons with disabilities requiring accommodations should contact Jacobi.

PNC 10th Anniversary Odyssey Sculpture Show Debuts

photo of Two Part Folding Screen
Two Part Folding Screen
by George Sugarman

 Purdue University North Central celebrates the 10 th anniversary of its Odyssey Arts and Cultural Events Series with a public opening of its multi-piece contemporary sculpture exhibit, Odyssey 2008 – 09 on Saturday, Oct. 11, at 5 to 6:30 p.m. in the Library-Student-Faculty Building Assembly Hall Room 02. This event will feature welcoming remarks and sculptors’ comments. The program is free and open to the public. Refreshments will be served.

The Odyssey exhibit includes 13 new sculptures bringing the total to 34 sculptures to grace that 268-acre campus of the PNC Westville campus and PNC – Porter County , 600 Vale Park Road in Valparaiso .

S. Thomas Scarff, in his 10th year as curator of the PNC Odyssey sculpture exhibits, remarks, “I am thrilled to celebrate the 10 th anniversary of Odyssey. Each year we’ve had beautiful, dynamic, thought-provoking pieces from notable emerging and established artists. The PNC Odyssey sculpture exhibit is the largest outdoor sculpture installation in the area. We are fortunate to have this here. I invite everyone to come out to enjoy this unique event .”

Many of the sculptors will begin installing their pieces on campus during the week of Oct. 6. The public is invited to visit to see the work that goes into delivering and preparing a piece for placement, as well as the actual installation. The sculptors have no timetable for their work that week, but guests are free to visit campus and browse the current Odyssey sculptures and watch any new setup activity.

The Odyssey Cultural Series also includes a number of events throughout the year, including exhibits of art, film showings and presentations.

Also debuting as part of the Odyssey Arts and Cultural Events Series are the works of 20 th century American artist, George Sugarman. PNC is now home to the definitive collection of Sugarman’s work featuring paintings, sculpture, photos, books and works on paper. This collection has been donated by The George Sugarman Foundation, Inc.

Selected paintings by George Sugarman and the sculpture Earth Bird will be shown in the PNC Library-Student-Faculty Building Assembly Hall, Room 02, through the end of 2008. To view this exhibit, call 219-785-5593 or 219-785-5719. Two additional sculptures and a variety of framed paintings and works on paper will be featured in the PNC Library and Odyssey Gallery on the second floor of the LSF Building . An introduction to the exhibit features 35 framed works, a montage of photographs of the artist and his biography.

The gallery is open Monday to Thursday from 7:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m.; Friday, 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Saturday, 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.

Another Sugarman sculpture, Two Blues and a Red, is on display on the first floor of Schwarz Hall, adjacent to the Chancellor’s Office, Room 137.

Sculptors who will debut works as part of Odyssey 2008-09 are:

Dusty Folwarczny – Bration. This 15-foot tall sculpture is made of recycled steel and steel cable. This piece is a tribute to wind chimes. Wind and sound have been incorporated in the sculpture to help engage the viewer.

Dusty Folwarczny – Cutoff. Made of recycled steel, this is a play on the definition of cutoff in theoretical physics as the maximal or minimal value of energy, momentum or length, so that the objects with even larger or smaller values than these physical quantities are ignored.

Terrence Karpowicz – Prairie Needle. With this granite and steel sculpture, Karpowicz attempts to widen the visual playing field. The sculpture is “like a spire on the landscape.”  

Richard Kiebdaj – “ho-MA-ge.” Is an homage to renowned cellist Yo-Yo Ma. The sculpture includes clusters of cello forms and a very large yo-yo.

Fisher Stolz – Seduction. It is made of iron and steel and represents the enticement or bait within a trap. Viewers are lured into the middle of the sculpture to feel the scale and power of the form surrounding them. Fisher Stolz – Illumination. This sculpture of aluminum, steel, granite and light makes use of recycled campus outdoor lighting. The name, Illumination, references the enlightenment that lives in institutions of higher learning.

S. Thomas Scarff – Drive-By. Composed of aluminum, metalized aluminum bronze and L.E.D. lighting, this piece explores the visual phenomena of moiré patterns – ghosting and waving. These patterns occur when driving by a lighted, static object. This is a 24 hour piece with a natural daylight effect and a completely different night effect.

Bruce White – Ghostship. This painted aluminum sculpture is a composite of memories from the artist’s childhood.

Bruce White – Twin Fin Continuum. Also made of painted aluminum, this is an organic bright red abstraction of a form evolving.

George Sugarman – Two Part Folding Screen. The work consists of two vertical pieces, created from various-colored thin aluminum sheets, cut out in a floral-like pattern. One part is largely orange and the other is multi-colored, with forms pointing upward. Sugarman created this piece in 1985.

George Sugarman – Two Blues and a Red. This 1990 sculpture made from oil-painted heavy gauge aluminum evokes power instead of delicacy. The shorter red section is cube-like, with various cut-outs including a large circle. The other section is taller, painted blue and arches away from the red section.

George Sugarman – A Green Field. Made in 1985, this is a unique multi-colored work composed of polychrome aluminum and has two separate sections of cutouts that are abstract representations of the outdoors.

George Sugarman – Earth Bird. This green and red painted steel floor piece was made in 1975. It suggests a flying creature emerging from the earth.

Existing Odyssey pieces are:

John Adduci – Running Arch

Michael Dunbar – Jendiva

Michele Goldstrom – Oh! 

Mike Helbing – Victory at Samothrace

Preston Jackson – Haints + History; Travels of My Seven Sisters

Kara James – Handmade Revolution

Dessa Kirk – Demeter

Rob Lorenson – First Gear; Sentinel

David Noguchi – Rise, at PNC – Porter County

Eric Nordgulen – Anatomy Vessel

Jason Poteet – Rumination

Christine Rojek – Rubber Tipped Crane

S. Thomas Scarff – Geisha Rose, Rainbow Flyer. At PNC – Porter County are Light Ray, Indigo Flame, Eyepiece

Jessica M. Swift – Light Time/Flight Time

Zelda Werner – Alexander’s Circus

Most works are for sale.

The Odyssey sculpture exhibit is open to the public during university hours. Visitors are encouraged to come on Thursdays and Fridays when parking is ample. Self-guided sculpture tour maps can be downloaded at http://www.pnc.edu/odyssey/flyer.pdf. The Web site for the Odyssey 2008-09 sculpture exhibit is http://www.pnc.edu/odyssey . Information on group tours is available by contacting Judy Jacobi, assistant vice chancellor of Marketing and Community Relations at 219-785-5200 ext. 5593. Persons with disabilities requiring accommodations should contact Jacobi.

PNC and Partners to Lead 2005 Provence Festival

PNC and Partners to Lead 2005 Provence Festival

WESTVILLE – Purdue University North Central and several community partners will together lead the summer event, “Find Provence Here! A Celebration of Arts, Culture and The Good Life Along Lake Michigan’s Riviera!”

Provence (pronounced Pro-VAHNS) is the sunny Southeastern region of France where artists such as Van Gogh, Picasso, Chagall and others found great creative inspiration. Today it is still considered an unmatched source of arts and culture, leisure, learning, quaint village shops, hospitality and cuisine. Its natural beauty, including vast fields of sunflowers, lavender and charming gardens and the blue waters of the Riviera, characterize “the good life”, or joie de vivre, in French.

LaPorte County and the Michiana region, bear many resemblances to the region in the summer tourist season. In fact, the area has been referred to as Lake Michigan’s Riviera.

This year’s Provence event will span six weeks from July 7 through Aug. 21. LaPorte County and Michiana-area restaurants, bed and breakfasts, galleries, artists, boutiques and other businesses and organizations are invited to offer events or offer themed retail features for the public to enjoy. The Provence festival was introduced in 2004 and drew more than a thousand area residents as well as tourists from the region.

Businesses and organizations are encouraged to be part of this growing event. Activities, shows and exhibits can be offered for both adults and children. They can be interactive, educational or simply for relaxation and enjoyment.

PNC will again offer mini art seminars on campus through the Office of Continuing Education, as well as an array of unique gardens among the Odyssey sculptures.

Provence partner Lubeznik Center for the Arts will again offer learning activities for children. Plus, the annual Lakefront Arts Festival will cap off the celebration on Aug. 20 and 21.

NIPSCO, as a partner, will again sponsor a jazz concert, featuring the popular North Coast Sound. This year, the Michigan City Senior Center will co-sponsor the event on the lake on Saturday, Aug. 6.

“The News-Dispatch” will also partner with PNC to publicize and highlight specific events.

The idea for the Provence festival was generated July, 2004 by the PNC Office of Campus Relations. The initiative took root throughout LaPorte County.

“We want to encourage the growth of a more viable arts and cultural economy and environment in LaPorte County and Michiana and provide low- or no-cost opportunities for citizens of all ages to enjoy features of the area,” said Judy Jacobi, PNC director of marketing.

“We welcome LaPorte County and Michiana businesses, non-profit groups and organizations to participate in any creative way that lends itself to the Provence theme, emphasizing arts, culture and the good life.”

“It will provide fun, educational and entertaining events for our community residents as well as out-of-town visitors. This is a tremendous opportunity for communities to highlight the arts, natural beauty, good cuisine, leisure, learning and unique shopping destinations,” Jacobi said.

Participating organizations thus far:

  • Woodruff Garden Center
  • Friendship Gardens of Michigan City
  • NIPSCO
  • The Michigan City Senior Center
  • Michiana Resources of Michigan City
  • PNC Department of Continuing Education
  • Lubeznik Center for the Arts
  • Marquette Mall of Michigan City
  • Michigan City Chamber Music Festival, Inc.
  • The News-Dispatch
  • The Michigan City Public Library
  • Lighthouse Place
  • Fatouros Media, Inc.

Further information can be obtained by contacting Jacobi at jjacobi@pnc.edu, or 800-872-1231, ext. 5593.

Odyssey Sculpture Exhibit Adds Four New Pieces

Odyssey Sculpture Exhibit Adds Four New Pieces

WESTVILLE – The Purdue University North Central Odyssey 2004 – 05 multi-piece contemporary sculpture exhibit, has added four new sculptures to its Freedom Colonnade on campus.

The Freedom Colonnade on University Drive, located on the north side of the PNC campus, displays 13 sculptures that reflect the theme of “Freedom.”

The Odyssey 2004 – 05 exhibit opened in October and it brings together 18 new sculptures that grace the 305 acres of the PNC campus. They joined 14 existing sculptures on campus. The public is invited to view this free exhibit. All pieces are outdoors and maps for self-guided tours are available on campus.

The Odyssey Arts and Cultural Events series is celebrating its sixth year at PNC. The series includes a number of other art exhibits, film festivals, concerts, lectures and programs of general interest.

Sculptors exhibiting the newly added works are:

Peter J. Smith-Phillips – Transworkstar – A steel piece that reflects thoughts on freedom and religiosity.

Eric Stephenson – Emergence #11 (Free Spirit) – This work was inspired by the notion of a free spirit, acting in free will on free ideas. The gestural figure springs from an industrialized owl’s head, symbolizing the juxtaposition of humanity and technology, knowledge and action, language and thought.

John Mason – Ares in Transition #2 – A representation of the dynamic potential of freedom, as a bird “erupts” from the base.

David Noguchi – Forever Ours II – Represents the human zeal for freedom – “a burning flame within us.”

All pieces are for sale.Further information about the sculptures and the Odyssey series can be obtained by contacting Judy Jacobi, director of marketing at 800-872-1231, ext. 5593. Persons with disabilities requiring accommodations should contact Jacobi.