PNC Representative Named to ICC Advisory Council

Laura Weaver

Laura Weaver

Laura Weaver, Service Learning coordinator for Purdue University North Central, was named the Indiana Campus Compact Advisory Council Chair Elect for the 2014-2015 academic year. At the conclusion of the 2014-2015 year, Weaver will serve as the Advisory Council Chairperson for two years, at which time she will also serve on the Indiana Campus Compact Board of Directors.

The Advisory Council is an eight member board representing faculty and staff members from across Indiana and are selected based on the individual’s experience in and knowledge of the field of service and civic engagement, as well as their ability to provide leadership and skill sets to the Networking Council and the Indiana Campus Compact staff. The Advisory Council consists of one faculty member and one staff member representing large public colleges and universities, small public colleges and universities, independent colleges and universities and community colleges.

Indiana Campus Compact supports higher education’s efforts to develop students into well-informed, engaged citizens. By providing programs, services, and resources, ICC serves as a catalyst for campuses and communities to improve people’s lives through service-learning and civic engagement initiatives.

Further information about Campus Compact may be obtained by visiting www.indianacampuscompact.org.

Workshop for Adobe Photoshop Intermediate Users

The Purdue University North Central Office of Graduate and Extended Learning will offer a non-credit program for people who want to learn to use Adobe Photoshop software.

The program will meet Tuesdays from Jan. 13 through Feb. 17 from 5 to 7 p.m. Registration is $159 and includes all materials. Special rates are available for PNC students, alumni and employees. The registration deadline is Jan. 6 at 4 p.m.

This class will include a review of basic Photoshop features and a series of exercises involving more advanced tools and techniques. There are no prerequisites for participating in this program.

Participants will focus on non-destructive editing techniques such as layer masks and smart objects, toning images, creating panoramas, working with raw files and how and why to change color spaces. These skills may be used for a variety of purposes, including making scrapbook pages and web pages, editing images for use with social media, retouching photos or creating original artwork with composite images and more.

To register or obtain further information about this program, visit http://www.pnc.edu/gel/ or contact Cassandra Boehlke, coordinator of Graduate and Extended Learning, at (219) 785-5748, or cboehlke@pnc.edu. Persons with disabilities requiring accommodations should contact Boehlke.

PNC Bookstore “The Dog and the Dolphin” Book Signing

James Dworkin

Purdue University North Central Chancellor Dr. James B. Dworkin with his newly published book, “The Dog and the Dolphin.” This is Dworkin’s first children’s book.

Purdue University North Central Chancellor Dr. James B. Dworkin will host a signing of his children’s book, “The Dog and The Dolphin” on Thursday, Dec. 18 from 1 to 2:30 p.m.in the lower level of the PNC Library-Student-Faculty Building, just outside the at the PNC Campus Shop. Light refreshments will be served.

Books will be available for purchase. Dworkin will also sign books that had been previously purchased. A portion of the proceeds from the sale of the book goes toward supporting programs and scholarships in the PNC Early Childhood Education program, which will be an enduring legacy of “The Dog and the Dolphin.”

The book is also available for purchase at amazon.com , in the Purdue University Calumet bookstore and through the website thedogandthedolphin.com.

The “Dog and the Dolphin” tells the delightful story of two unlikely friends who meet on a beach in Florida.

The children’s story was inspired by an interaction Dworkin observed several years ago while vacationing with his family on Sanibel Island, Fla. During a visit to the beach, Dworkin watched a dog, depicted in the book as an Irish setter named Red, wander the beach. The dog strolled around, sniffed here and there and seemed to be bored, said Dworkin. When the dog gazed into the water, it caught a glimpse of something that interested him. A dolphin was frolicking a short distance away.

Dworkin observed that the dog was clearly interested in the dolphin and it seemed like the dolphin noticed the dog on the beach. The dolphin appeared so interested in the dog that it would swim in the same direction that the dog ran. When the dog ran to the left, the dolphin followed. If the dog ran to the right, the dolphin changed direction too. The dog was so taken with his new friend; he tried to swim out to it with a Frisbee so they could play together. This story of an unusual friendship between a dog and a dolphin teaches valuable lessons of friendship and diversity as the story’s two characters form an unlikely, yet unmistakable bond.

Esteemed portrait artist Michael Chelich, of Munster, illustrated the story. As a first-time book illustrator, Chelich created amazingly detailed, life-like art work to help to tell the story of what took place on the beach that sunny day.

Dworkin is an accomplished author and “The Dog and the Dolphin” is his first children’s book. He already has an inspiration for a second children’s book. Dworkin has written the books, “Owners Versus Players: Baseball and Collective Bargaining” (Boston: Auburn House Publishing Company, 1981), and “Reflections on the Transformation in Industrial Relations” (Scarecrow Press, 1989). He has also written and edited numerous articles and chapters for a variety of professional publications.

Information on readings and book signings will be available at www.thedogandthedolphin.com.

PNC Students Collect Donations for Thanksgiving Meals

Elly Johansen and Paige Mellen

PNC Students Elly Johansen and Paige Mellen

Purdue University North Central students continued the long-standing campus tradition of collecting donations to provide food for Thanksgiving meals for 30 deserving PNC students and their families.

Students in the Dean’s Leadership Group, along with the Accounting Club and MBA Leadership Council spent the month of November gathering donations of non-perishable food along with monetary donations that was used to purchase frozen turkeys, along with dinner rolls and other necessary items.

Elly Johansen, the Dean’s Leadership Group treasurer, volunteered to lead the food drive. “I believe everyone should have a nice meal on Thanksgiving,” said Johansen, who is a Social Work major.

The families received a turkey and traditional side dishes, along with additional food staples such as spaghetti, rice, noodles, soup and similar non-perishable items. Ideally, enough food was provided for the students to be able to prepare a meal for a family of five at home.

Monetary donations were gathered through the on-campus sale of paper turkey cut outs for $1. The outpouring of support thrilled Johansen as many students, faculty and staff gave more than the minimum donation.

“One student and her mother immediately donated $100,” she related. “When I put out a collection box at PNC – Porter County, a staff member handed me $50. The Chancellor has supported us; our Veterans have been very generous. People wanted to donate.”

The primary objective of the Dean’s Leadership Group (DLG) is to help its members develop their leadership skills through various campus and community projects. The 25 DLG members are asked to volunteer 50 hours of community service time a year. The students are involved with a number of activities each year and support on another in their efforts.

DLG President Paige Mellen, of Michigan City and a Business major with a concentration in Management, noted that leading a project can seem like a daunting task at times, but working through it and seeing your success is “empowering.”

“It’s a great feeling when you can see that your hard work has paid off,” she explained. “It seems like everyone pulls together and works for a good cause.”

A graduate of Morgan Township High School, Johansen said that she volunteered with a number of projects, but this is the first that she’s led, “It’s a lot of work, but there’s also a sense of achievement too. It is satisfying to know that we’re helping other students.”

While the students will never know the names of the recipients and their families who received the food baskets, that’s fine with Johansen and Mellen.

“I am satisfied just knowing that we are helping out and paying it forward,” said Johansen. “I am happy to be in a position to help.”

 

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PNC Early Childhood Education Program Earns Grant

University North Central (PNC) Center for Early Learning   recently received a $1,000 GreenWorks! Grant from the Project Learning Tree® (PLT), the environmental education program of the American Forest Foundation (AFF), for students in the PNC Early Childhood Education program to work with Westville Little School in Westville, to create a garden as a learning experience.

The PNC Early Childhood Education teachers candidates will use the grant to work with preschoolers to plan, create, and implement the garden on the school grounds. The garden will include plants with interesting textures, scents, colors, and names to stimulate the children’s development.

The Westville Little School is a collaboration between the Westville-New Durham School Corporation, Dunebrook, and PNC. The goal is to prepare young children and their families for a seamless transition to kindergarten.

“For the young learners, the Children’s Garden will become a source of civic pride and an appropriate play space. The college learners will exercise leadership skills,” said Mary Jane Eisenhauer, PNC associate professor of Early Childhood Education.

This grant was one of 63 awarded to schools and youth organizations in 33 states and the District of Columbia. For a list of all projects receiving grants, go to www.plt.org/GreenWorks-grant-award-winners-2015.

GreenWorks! is the service-learning component of Project Learning Tree that engages educators, students, and their communities in “learning-by-doing” local environmental stewardship projects. Since 1992, AFF has distributed more than $1 million to fund more than 1,000 PLT GreenWorks! action projects in communities across the country. The USDA Forest Service funded all GreenWorks! grants this year, up to $2,000 each.

American Sign Language Club Coffeehouse is Dec. 12

The Purdue University North Central American Sign Language Club will host an ASL Coffeehouse on Friday, Dec. 12, from 5 to 7:30 p.m. at the Uptown Café, 1400 E. Lincolnway, Valparaiso. The event will feature a fun, interactive activity.

The coffeehouse is open to ASL students as well as community members and children are welcome to attend with a parent or adult. This is a pleasant, casual event for all to enjoy either through participation or as an observer.

Participants are asked to use ASL providing an ideal opportunity to practice ASL to better communicate with friends, co-workers or family members. Coffee, food and drink may be ordered throughout the evening.

Information about the Purdue North Central ASL Club may be found at www.aslclub.info. Information about other events in the community is posted at: www.nwideaf.org/deafevents.htm.

Further information about the coffeehouse may be obtained by contacting Joanna Witulski, limited term lecturer in American Sign Language, at pncaslwitulski@yahoo.com.

PNC Construction Club Connects Students with Professionals

Dwight Graham. Robert Kennedy, Bob Long

Dwight Graham, president of Board of Directors, LaPorte County Habitat for Humanity; Robert Kennedy, PNC Construction Club vice president; Bob Long, executive director, LaPorte County Habitat for Humanity

Members of the Purdue University North Central Construction Club recently hosted a networking breakfast to connect students with area professionals, showcase the PNC Construction Engineering and Management Technology program and raise money for the LaPorte County Habitat for Humanity.

The Construction Club has been part of the PNC campus for more than 25 years. Its alumni work throughout Indiana and across the country.

“The breakfast provided a unique opportunity for PNC students to meet with a number of reputable companies,” said Robert Kennedy, Construction Club vice president and a key organizer of the event. “It is not very often that these businesses get together in the same room to network with students. Most wanted to attend because they were interested in hiring students for internships and full-time positions.”

Event sponsors were: Berglund Construction, Inc., Chesterton; DA Dodd, Inc., Rolling Prairie; DH2W Architects, Michigan City; LaPorte County Solid Waste District; Performance Services, Indianapolis; Rieth-Riley Construction, located throughout Indiana and the Midwest; The Troyer Group, South Bend; Tonn & Blank Construction, Michigan City; Wall Constructors LLC, Michigan City and Ziolkowski Construction, Inc., South Bend.

Construction Club members, PNC College of Engineering and Technology students, faculty, business professionals and representatives of LaPorte County Habitat for Humanity got to know one another.

“This is an ideal time for students to establish relationships with potential employers,” said Martha Garcia-Saenz, associate professor of Construction Engineering and Management Technology and Construction Club faculty advisor. “For some, it is a kind of interview in an informal setting.”

By speaking with the professionals, students explored the many career options available to get a better idea of how they may apply their talents. Students learned what employers look for when hiring and the guests were happy to answer questions.

“The students were fascinated by their conversations with the professionals,” said Garcia-Saenz. “The breakfast was like a blind date, no one knew who they would sit with, but maybe some found their match by the end of breakfast.”

Kennedy has more than 10 years of experience in the field. “I’ve worked primarily in the federal public works sector on large projects across the U.S.,” he explained. “I served in many capacities, primarily in project management and safety management. My most notable experience was as project manager for concrete cutting/removal operations in Wedge 3 at the Pentagon after the 9/11 attacks.”

He worked with a bridge removal and installation for the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service, did approach lighting upgrades at an airport, worked in construction safety management at BP Oil Refinery in Whiting, was with a Sinclair Oil Refinery in Wyoming and a 100 million-gallon Ethenol Plant in Illinois.

He is earning a PNC degree to enhance his credentials. Eventually, he would like to own a construction management firm.

Bob Long, executive director of LaPorte County Habitat for Humanity, welcomed the opportunity to celebrate the evolving relationship between PNC and LaPorte County Habitat.

“Rob Kennedy took the lead in re-connecting the Construction Club with Habitat,” said Long. “He conceived of and organized the event and solicited volunteers to work on home builds. I visualize this relationship expanding. The combination of students willing to learn and an organization in need of committed, enthusiastic volunteers is a winning combination. I look forward to the possibility of a more formal collaboration with PNC.”

Kennedy noted that the club connected Habitat with Continental Carpentry Components, a local roof and floor truss manufacturer, to provide roof and floor trusses for two recent habitat houses. Club members volunteered with the most recent house in Michigan City.

Breakfast guests signed a 2×4 that will become part of the next LaPorte County Habitat for Humanity home.

“We appreciate the support of the administration, staff, students and Construction Club for furthering our mission of providing decent, affordable homes to families in our community.”

Ziolkowski Construction, general contractor for the PNC Student Services and Activities Complex, will give the Construction Club access to the job site so students can observe, discuss and learn.

The Construction Club has a team working on a project for the National Association of Home Builders construction competition in Las Vegas in January. The project, due Dec. 27, asks students to design, prepare a construction estimate and budget; construction schedule; cash flow projections; project management and organization; marketing plan and risk analysis; project site plan; land development plan and green building initiatives for a 40-acre development in Tennessee.

The students are expected to submit professional-level plans and construction company executives acting as judges expect the same work as they would from any builder or contractor.

Learn more about the Construction Club at http://pnc-constructionclub.weebly.com/

PNC Non-Credit Grant Writing Program

The Purdue University North Central Office of Graduate and Extended Learning and Office of Learning Technology, in partnership with Independent Cat Society, in Westville, will offer a non-credit workshop explaining how to write grants.

The 10-week workshop meets Wednesdays from Feb. 11, through April 15, from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. It will be taught by Dr. Anastasia Trekles, PNC clinical professor and director of Learning Technologies, and Roberta Jocius, grant coordinator and an adoption counselor for the Independent Cat Society; a non-profit organization dedicated to animal welfare.

Registration is $395 and includes all materials. Special rates are available for PNC students, alumni and employees. The registration deadline is Feb. 4, at 4 p.m. A portion of the proceeds will benefit the Independent Cat Society.

This course is designed to help participants become more skilled in grant writing and identifying grant-providing agencies and foundations. Through practice in developing and refining ideas at each major stage of the grant writing process, participants will become more familiar with the necessary steps in obtaining a grant and defining the requirements of a grant-funded project.

By the end of the course, participants will be able to identify grant requests for proposal that are available and obtain information on how to qualify and apply by researching and discussing with peers to share resources, determine what a quality grant proposal looks like, describe and rationalize how grant funding will be spent in a proposal and relate how a grant-funded program will be evaluated for effectiveness.

To register or obtain further information about this program, visit http://www.pnc.edu/gel/ or contact Cassandra Boehlke, coordinator of Graduate and Extended Learning, at (219) 785-5748, or cboehlke@pnc.edu. Persons with disabilities requiring accommodations should contact Boehlke.

PNC Tuition Discount Program

Purdue University North Central students have the opportunity to reduce the cost of earning a bachelor’s degree thanks to the PNC tuition discount plan. PNC students will receive a 10 percent rate reduction for each credit hour taken beyond 12 hours per semester. The discount plan is designed to provide financial incentives for students to increase the number of credit hours taken each semester and encourage them to graduate in four years.

Spring semester classes begin the week of Jan. 12. Students may enroll in spring and summer classes.

This fall semester, PNC students saved a collective $100,000 in tuition costs thanks to the PNC tuition discount program. About 54 percent of PNC students took advantage of the discount option. These students took a total of 4,523 additional credit hours.

These students not only saved tuition dollars, but they also helped to ensure that they will graduate sooner than they would have if they took fewer credit hours. Students who earn 15 credit hours each semester will be able to complete a typical 120 credit hour bachelor’s degree in eight semesters, meaning that they will earn their degrees in four years, save more than $500 under the new discount plan and enter their chosen profession sooner.

In comparison, students who earn 12 credit hours each semester will need 10 semesters, or five years, to complete a typical 120 credit hour bachelor’s degree.

A recent report issued by the Indiana Commission for Higher Education noted that students who delay completing their degrees pay more tuition dollars and lose potential wages and career opportunities.

Teresa Lubbers, Indiana Commissioner for Higher Education noted, “Earning an on-time degree will always be the best and most affordable path to college graduation.”

Further information about the tuition discount program can be obtained by contacting 219-785-5505, or visiting www.pnc.edu.

PNC Students Collect Donations for Thanksgiving Meals

Elly Johansen and Paige Mellen

PNC Students Elly Johansen and Paige Mellen

Purdue University North Central students are continuing the campus tradition of collecting donations to provide Thanksgiving meals to deserving PNC students. Students in the Dean’s Leadership Group, along with the Accounting Club and MBA Leadership Council are working to collect donations of non-perishable food along with monetary donations that will buy turkeys, dinner rolls and other necessary items.

Elly Johansen, the Dean’s Leadership Group treasurer, volunteered to lead the food drive. “I believe everyone should have a nice meal on Thanksgiving,” said Johansen, who is a Social Work major.

The students have committed to proving food for Thanksgiving meals for the families of 30 students. This includes the turkey and traditional side dishes. Some of the food donations will provide some additional food staples such as spaghetti, rice, noodles, soup and other non-perishable items.

The outpouring of support has thrilled Johansen. “One student and her mother immediately donated $100,” she related. “When I put out a collection box at PNC – Porter County, a staff member handed me $50. The Chancellor has supported us; our Veterans have been very generous. People want to donate.”

Monetary donations are gathered through the on-campus sale of paper turkey cut outs for $1. Johansen is finding that many students, faculty and staff are giving more than the minimum donation.

The primary objective of the Dean’s Leadership Group (DLG) is to help its members develop their leadership skills through various campus and community projects. The 25 DLG members are asked to volunteer 50 hours of community service time a year. The students are involved with a number of activities each year and support on another in their efforts.

DLG President Paige Mellen, of Michigan City and a Business major with a concentration in Management, noted that leading a project can seem like a daunting task at times, but working through it and seeing your success is “empowering.”

“It’s a great feeling when you can see that your hard work has paid off,” she explained. “It seems like everyone pulls together and works for a good cause.”

A graduate of Morgan Township High School, Johansen said that she volunteered with a number of projects, but this is the first that she’s led, “It’s a lot of work, but there’s also a sense of achievement too. It is satisfying to know that we’re helping other students.”

While the students will never know the names of the recipients and their families who will receive the food baskets, that’s fine with Johansen and Mellen.

“I am satisfied just knowing that we are helping out and paying it forward,” said Johansen. “I am happy to be in a position to help.”